Published: Apr 7, 2021
Last Updated: Sep 30, 2021

There was a report about thought leadership that came out last year. It provided a lot of interesting data, but there is one number that’s been stuck in my head since I read it.

Only 17 percent of decision-makers who read thought leadership consider it to be very good.

That’s it. Less than a quarter think what they are reading is of high quality. I spend a lot of time consuming thought leadership. It’s part of the job, and I think I know why so much of it is considered poor. It’s because what people are trying to pass off as thought leadership isn’t really that at all. Most of it is poorly disguised product collateral, and readers are savvy enough to see the difference.

How do you create thought leadership that provides value to those reading it? We have some ideas. Twenty-six of them, actually.

Our ABCs of Thought Leadership will help you take a closer look at the thought leadership you’re creating (or the thought leadership you want to create) and determine if it actually lives up to the label.

You can either read it embedded below or click on it and read it a little larger in a new window. Either way, we think you’ll find it helpful.

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About the Author

Jarrett Rush
Jarrett Rush
Jarrett is responsible for the creation and implementation of client content strategy, ensuring not only is the right message being communicated but that it's being communicated in the right places using the right methods.

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